Tag Archives: journalism

Complex Things Explained in 10 Words or Less

Another open-ended discussion challenging others to explain something complex in under ten words:

Cancer is what happens when cells forget how to die.

Less vs. fewer: If you can count it, use fewer.

Computers – they do exactly what they’re told to.

You’re made of chemicals. They work like magnetic Legos. Neat.

Geocaching is playing hide and seek using billion dollar satellites

Put penis in vagina. Move back and forth. Wait. Baby!

Evolution: Try a bunch of random shit, toss what doesn’t work.

Anyone can be happy if they lower their standards enough.

Google – an algorithm to show you what other people wanted.

Orbits: Falling sideways so fast, you continually miss the ground.

Q: How do vaccines cause autism? A: They don’t.

Journalism: Call people and write down the dumbest things they say.

Existence: Get conceived, be born, live a while, die, be forgotten.

The entire universe is simply four forces acting on energy.

All from http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/1wmy8c/what_is_the_most_complicated_thing_that_you_can/

Image from http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa107/mnbilliards/Fun%20Pix/Pool/10-Ball-Real.png

The White Correspondent’s Burden

“But this doesn’t explain why journalism from Africa looks and sounds as it does. For this, we blame our editors, who (we like to say) oversimplify our copy and cut out context. … For these tendencies, our editors in turn often blame readers, whom they assume can’t or won’t follow us through villages with difficult-to-pronounce names or narratives with nuanced conclusions or moral ambiguities.
Ultimately, the problem with journalism from Africa isn’t about professional conventions. It’s about all of us—writers and readers, producers and viewers. We continue a storytelling tradition that hasn’t fundamentally changed since Joseph Conrad slapped Congo with “the heart of darkness” label. Even stories that gesture toward something “positive” can’t escape the dominant narrative: “Africa isn’t a lost cause,” pleads one recent headline. The argument about journalism from Africa is often whittled into two camps, Afro-pessimists vs. Afro-optimists. But these binary camps, too, miss that Africa is many complex things, simultaneously. In our news broadcasts and our headlines, though, it’s usually framed by just one static thing: suffering.”

Boston Review