Category Archives: War on Some Drugs

Bea Arthur and Rock Hudson Sing About Drugs

Bea Arthur and Rock Hudson sing “Turnin’ On” from the 1977 musical I Love My Wife (directed by Arthur’s husbad) on The Beatrice Arthur Special:

The simple life it must have been
When “smoke” was Luckys and “high” was gin
One pink lady and how it turned ‘em on!
“Junk” was trash, “speed” was swift
Glue was pasted instead of sniffed
Coke and aspirin, and wow it turned ‘em on! (full lyrics)

Drugs and Lies

“I’ve been of the personal opinion that the strident anti-pot messages have been particularly damaging to the goal of keeping kids away from dangerous stuff. Pot is not dangerous. It just isn’t. But adults insist that it is, and scream bloody murder about it, all red-faced with their wattles shaking. Then, when the kids actually try it, they figure out that, yet again, the adults are lying to them, as they so frequently do. So then they ignore the screaming about drugs that are actually dangerous I’m not sure if this is still common parlance, but in my youth, pot was called “a gateway drug”. And I think they’re right about that, but not for the reasons they believe. It’s not that pot automatically leads to heroin, it’s that lying about pot means that kids don’t trust you about heroin. Basing your anti-drug campaign around falsehoods is about as counter-productive a strategy as one could possibly come up with.

Commenter on Metafilter in a thread about drug policy..

George Tenet Digest

Much ado about Tenet on 60 Minutes. Here’s some scrapings:

He repeated “We do not torture” five times within the space of one paragraph. And then, if you bluster and bully and say, “Now, listen to me. Now, you’re not hearing me,” that people will take you more seriously. This is ridiculous. Of course, they torture.

and

Last night on Larry King Live, Tenet obstinately rejected the call to return the medal [of Freedom, awarded to him by Bush after he left the CIA]: I would never give thought to giving back the Medal of Freedom. … I accepted the award on their behalf [the men and women of the CIA] and I will never give that medal back.

and

Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz on George Tenet’s criticisms: “So what’s interesting here is: This is no longer the liberal media saying this. This is no longer a bunch of journalists of questionable patriotism saying the Bush administration rushed to war; wanted to invade Iraq all along; didn’t have a serious debate. This is the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency.”

Women Break Through Glass Ceiling in Drug Cartels

You’ve come a long way baby:

Challenging the stereotype of macho Mexico, women are moving into positions of power in male-dominated drug cartels but in the process suffering gruesome deaths in turf wars among traffickers. Corrupt female police officers have proved adept at recruiting teams of attractive, well-dressed women to smuggle drugs past border guards in the face of increased security, winning the respect of cartel leaders. Women are unlikely to be searched during drug raids because Mexican police and army units rarely include a female team member, police say.

Why Is There a War on Drugs?

(via Digg)

Creepy cogent quote:

There is a war on drugs because the people who control the State do not want to be stuck answering the phone, they want an excuse to break down your door. In other words, they don’t want to be limited to providing dispute resolution services, they want an instrument of social control that they can extend. Real dispute resolution has to serve the requirements of the customer (a member of the public calls up and says that someone has stolen his car, requiring you to try and find it). The state in this role is at the beck and call of the public. If the public just goes about its own business, the state has nothing to do. However, victimless crimes offer a whole new opportunity for actively interfering in peoples lives: now the state is truly following its own agenda and can try to arrest people without the pesky problem of needing a complainant.

HOWTO: Save $1.2 Billion Dollars

From the GAO: (via Mefi)

Between 1998 and 2004, Congress appropriated over $1.2 billion to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) for the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign. GAO’s review of Westat’s evaluation reports and associated documentation leads to the conclusion that the evaluation provides credible evidence that the campaign was not effective in reducing youth drug use, either during the entire period of the campaign or during the period from 2002 to 2004 when the campaign was redirected and focused on marijuana use.